1. Gender-diverse teams produce more novel, higher-impact scientific discoveries, study shows

    New research from the University of Notre Dame examines about 6.6 million papers published across the medical sciences since 2000 and reveals that a team’s gender balance is an under-recognized, yet powerful indicator of novel and impactful scientific discoveries.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  2. Thom Browne Joins Notre Dame as an Artist in Residence, and Other News

    Thom Browne joins his alma mater University of Notre Dame as an artist in residence.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  3. Snoozing your alarm raises risk of dangerous health problem

    The University of Notre Dame study also found snoozers were more likely to spend the last hour before waking in a light sleep, constantly being buzzed by their alarm.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  4. Hitting the snooze button linked to unhealthy higher heart rate

    Researchers from the University of Notre Dame in the US have found that people who wake up after multiple alarms are more likely to have a higher heart rate than those who get out of bed after just one.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  5. You snooze, you lose: As six in ten of us hit snooze button, research finds spending that extra time in bed could lead to health problems

    Researchers from the University of Notre Dame in the United States also discovered that snoozers were more likely to spend the last hour before waking in a light sleep, compared to the deeper slumber enjoyed by non-snoozers.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  6. Indiana Research Universities Study PFAS Problem as Feds Move to Limit Contamination

    University of Notre Dame researchers, like professor of chemistry and biochemistry Graham Peaslee, have found PFAS chemicals in fast food packaging, firefighter turnout gear and cosmetics.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  7. Lead exposure in racially segregated housing lowers reading scores among Black children: study

    “In the midst of our country’s racial reckoning, we must work harder to understand and ultimately act on the deep effects that environmental justice and structural racism have on our country and our communities,” added co-author Marie Lynn Miranda, director of the CEHI and professor of applied and computational mathematics and statistics at the University of Notre Dame.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  8. Notre Dame, Purdue help launch microchip network

    The University of Notre Dame is part of one effort with the creation of a 12-member network of research universities, including Purdue. 

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  9. Consumers Lower Their Expectations of Future Inflation

    Jason Reed, a professor at the University of Notre Dame, said food and gasoline prices are very visible and so have a large role in how consumers view the economy.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  10. Notre Dame’s growing role in biomedicine

    For the second straight year, the University of Notre Dame is celebrating a record-breaking year of research funding, bringing in $22 million more than the previous fiscal year.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  11. Women have always trailed men in research output: how COVID made the situation worse

    Written by Patrizio Piraino, Armand Bam and Cyrill Walters.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  12. New Invention Restores Life-Saving Cells

    In a study that will be published in the journal Communications Biology, bioengineers at the University of Notre Dame have now shown that a new approach may heal the injured stem cells and allow them to once again grow new tissues.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  13. Increased solar activity could have significant impact on Earth

    “The starlink lost some satellites earlier this year because of some of the solar activity, so if we're disrupting those satellites, it can obviously impact our communications, if we have solar flares hitting the upper part of the atmosphere it can actually disrupt GPS signals that we use for positioning,” Jonathan Crass, Notre Dame Physics and Astronomy Assistant Research Professor.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  14. New research effort aims to help Hoosier manufacturers cut energy costs

    In this manufacturing energy project, researchers from Indiana University, Purdue University and the University of Notre Dame will use data gathered from the state’s new Energy INsights program, which helps participating manufacturers collect and analyze information about their energy usage.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  15. Midwest forests lost 8,000 years of stored carbon in just 150 years – new animated maps track the changes, revealing lessons for climate projects today

    Jason McLachlan, Associate Professor of Paleoecology, University of Notre Dame.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  16. Notre Dame touts research grants

    The University of Notre Dame says it received $244 million in research awards during fiscal year 2022, surpassing the previous record of $222.7 million set during the previous year. 

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  17. Nanoparticle 'backpacks' restore damaged stem cells

    Now, in a study forthcoming in Communications Biology, bioengineers at the University of Notre Dame have shown that a new strategy can restore the damaged stem cells and enable them to grow new tissues again.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  18. Revealed: US water likely contains more ‘forever chemicals’ than EPA tests show

    “Industry has had a 70-year head start and we’re never going to catch up,” said Graham Peaslee, a University of Notre Dame researcher.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  19. Using Nanoparticle “Backpacks” to Rejuvenate Damaged Stem Cells

    Donny Hanjaya-Putra, Assistant Professor, University of Notre Dame.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  20. Family’s $20M gift forms Notre Dame precision medicine institute

    The University of Notre Dame has been working in the area of precision medicine for more than a decade, but a recent $20 million gift is adding muscle to the effort, creating “a much larger impact than our footprint would ordinarily predict,” says Dr. Paul Bohn. 

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

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