1. Benjamin Franklin Developed a Money Invention We Didn't Know About

    A team of experts from the University of Notre Dame in Indiana detected the secret techniques after analyzing hundreds of paper bills printed more than 200 years ago.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  2. Benjamin Franklin put early anti-counterfeit measures in paper money

    Khachatur Manukyan at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana and his colleagues analysed the structure and chemical composition of more than 600 bills printed by Franklin and associates between 1709 and 1790.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  3. What Benjamin Franklin Learned While Fighting Counterfeiters

    The study draws on more than 600 artifacts held by the University of Notre Dame, said Khachatur Manukyan, a physicist at that institution and an author of the new paper. 

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  4. How Benjamin Franklin laid groundwork for the US dollar by foiling early counterfeiters

    A team at the University of Notre Dame has shed new light on his methods via advanced scanning techniques that reveal some of Franklin’s methods in greater detail — along the way, also providing one more reason Franklin appears on the $100 bill.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  5. How Benjamin Franklin Helped Foil Early American Money Counterfeiters

    Khachatur Manukyan, research associate professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Notre Dame, led a team that analyzed nearly 600 paper money notes printed in America from 1709 to 1790.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  6. ‘Win-win-win’ strategy reduces dangerous parasite infections in African villages

    In a randomized, controlled trial, researchers led by Jason Rohr of the University of Notre Dame paid residents of eight villages in Senegal to remove water plants every 3 months.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  7. Targeted prevention helps stop homelessness before it starts

    David Phillips, a research professor in the Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities (LEO) within Notre Dame's economics department, and James Sullivan, a professor of economics and co-founder of LEO, found that people offered EFA were 81 percent less likely to become homeless within six months of enrollment and 73 percent less likely within 12 months, as reported in their study recently published by The Review of Economics and Statistics.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  8. Environmental group tests to find the best water filters for removing PFAS

    "We've since discovered that all these PFAS are immune suppressants, so they suppress your immune system and that means any opportunistic disease, including some types of cancer, could take over," said Graham Peaslee, who is a biochemist.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  9. Researchers invent trap for capturing and comparing individual bacterial cells

    "For the average healthy person, P. aeruginosa does not pose a serious threat," said University of Notre Dame bacteriologist Joshua Shrout. "But for those who are most vulnerable—who are immunocompromised, who are using a ventilator or catheter, or who are recovering from serious burns or surgeries—it is not just serious, but life-threatening. And that is due to the bacteria's sophisticated suite of self-defense tactics."

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  10. Nearly half of the tap water in the US is contaminated with ‘forever chemicals,’ government study finds

    If PFAS is in 45% of US water systems, the country will have a lot of work to do, said Dr. Graham Peaslee, a professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy and concurrent professor of chemistry and biochemistry who does PFAS research at the University of Notre Dame.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  11. How do you know if drinking water is safe from forever chemicals?

    Whether you use city tap water, well water or buy bottled water, here’s what we know about PFAS in the water you drink.

    Originally published at science.nd.edu.

  12. People Who Work Hard May Be Bad Investors, Study Shows

    “Consumers feel greater psychological ownership over their earnings when they work hard for them,” lead author Christopher Bechler, a marketing professor at Notre Dame, explains in a blog post

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  13. The Path to Happiness Is Narrow But Easy

    In 2010, psychologists from the University of Rochester and the University of Notre Dame observed the dynamics of families over a three-year period.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  14. New approaches to evaluating water interventions around the globe

    The study was the result of an interdisciplinary collaboration with researchers from the Pulte Institute for Global Development and Keough School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  15. Working hard for money decreases consumers' willingness to risk their earnings, study shows

    "Working Hard for Money Decreases Risk Tolerance" is forthcoming in the Journal of Consumer Psychology from lead author Christopher Bechler, assistant professor of marketing in Notre Dame's Mendoza College of Business, along with Samina Lutfeali, Szu-chi Huang and Joshua Morris from Stanford University.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  16. How can I avoid eating food with ‘forever’ chemicals?

    “For the average consumer, there’s no way to avoid it,” said Graham Peaslee, a physics professor at the University of Notre Dame. “But, you can do some smart things.”

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  17. Researchers find psychopathy, narcissism linked to far-left extremism

    University of Notre Dame professor Patrick Deneen joined 'Fox & Friends Weekend' to discuss his reaction to the study and why the findings make 'perfect sense.'

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  18. Plastic containers still distributed across the US are a potential health disaster

    Inhance late last year also began claiming that an April 2022 adjustment to its fluorination process reduced PFAS leaching to negligible levels. That was contradicted by a late 2022 peer-reviewed University of Notre Dame study of Inhance containers.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  19. Six Institutions Invited To Join Association Of American Universities

    University of Notre Dame President Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C., said, “our mission at Notre Dame is to be a preeminent research university, provide an unsurpassed undergraduate education and to have all we do informed by our Catholic mission. We are honored to be invited to join the AAU, heartened by the AAU board’s recognition of our progress as a research university, and we look forward to participating in this august organization.”

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  20. Six universities join elite research group, including George Washington U.

    Three large public institutions known for providing access to educational opportunity are among the newcomers: Arizona State University and the universities of California at Riverside and South Florida. The other two are the private universities of Miami and Notre Dame.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

Archive