1. Workplace Bias Suppression Can Be Difficult to Sustain, Study Shows

    “When and Why Bias Suppression is Difficult to Sustain: The Asymmetric Effect of Intermittent Accountability” is published in the Academy of Management Journal by Brittany Solomon and Cindy Muir (Zapata), management professors at Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business, along with Matthew Hall, the David A. Potenziani Memorial College Professor of Constitutional Studies, concurrent law professor, and director of Notre Dame’s Rooney Center for the Study of American Democracy.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  2. Workplace bias suppression can be difficult to sustain, study shows Read more At: https://aninews.in/news/lifestyle/culture/workplace-bias-suppression-can-be-difficult-to-sustain-study-shows20210909091339/


    New research from the University of Notre Dame shows when and why bias suppression is so challenging to sustain from decision to the next.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  3. Workplace bias suppression can be difficult to sustain, study shows

    "When and Why Bias Suppression is Difficult to Sustain: The Asymmetric Effect of Intermittent Accountability" is forthcoming in the Academy of Management Journal from Brittany Solomon and Cindy Muir (Zapata), management professors at Notre Dame's Mendoza College of Business, along with Matthew Hall, the David A. Potenziani Memorial College Professor of Constitutional Studies, concurrent law professor and director of Notre Dame's Rooney Center for the Study of American Democracy.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  4. Humans vs. automation: Service center agents can outperform technology, study shows

    "A behavioral perspective on service center routing: The role of inertia" is forthcoming in the Journal of Operations Management from Nicholas Berente, the Viola D. Hank Associate Professor, and Kaitlin Wowak, associate professor of information technology, analytics and operations at Notre Dame's Mendoza College of Business.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  5. Is that long-lasting lipstick toxic? Study raises concerns about PFAS in cosmetics.

    The study was led by scientists at the University of Notre Dame and published in the Journal of Environmental Science & Technology Letters.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  6. Study Reveals Why Some Organizational Cover-Ups Go Unchecked

    New research from the University of Notre Dame identifies two common types of cover-ups and reveals why some are allowed to continue unchecked.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  7. The downside of loyalty: Study reveals why some organizational cover-ups go unchecked

    New research from the University of Notre Dame identifies two common types of cover-ups and reveals why some are allowed to continue unchecked.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  8. Director retention does not necessarily facilitate post-acquisition firm performance: study

    New research from the University of Notre Dame calls into question the wisdom of this move.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  9. Tips And 'Service With A Smile' Rules Fuel Sex Harassment In Restaurants, Study Says

    "Much of the research and media attention has focused on why organizational insiders, or other employees engage in sexual harassment. It really didn't address why service employees were likely to face sexual harassment from organizational outsiders, like customers," said Timothy Kundro, a professor at Notre Dame's Mendoza College of Business. 

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  10. New study confirms relationship between toxic pollution, climate risks to human health

    In a first-of-its-kind study that combines assessments of the risks of toxic emissions (e.g., fine particulate matter), nontoxic emissions (e.g., greenhouse gases) and people’s vulnerability to them, University of Notre Dame postdoctoral research associate Drew (Richard) Marcantonio, doctoral student Sean Field (anthropology), Associate Professor of Political Science Debra Javeline and Princeton’s Agustin Fuentes (formerly of Notre Dame) found a strong and statistically significant relationship between the spatial distribution of global climate risk and toxic pollution.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  11. Singapore, India and China are among the top 10 countries that are 'significantly' more likely to be impacted by both toxic pollution and climate change, study warns

    Researchers from the University of Notre Dame in Indiana discovered that if a nation is at risk of toxic air pollution, they will find it harder to adapt to global warming.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  12. Notre Dame study finds 'Service with a smile' and tips lead to culture of sexual harassment

    "What we really find is that customers in this condition feel a heightened sense of power," said Timothy Kundro, Assistant Professor of Management and Organization at Notre Dame and a coauthor of the study.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  13. Lawmakers introduced 2 new bills after a study found popular beauty products may contain cancer-linked 'forever chemicals'

    The bills follow a study conducted by The University of Notre Dame that tested US makeup products from Ulta Beauty, Sephora, Target, and Bed Bath & Beyond.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  14. Potentially Toxic Chemicals Called PFAS Are Common in Cosmetics, Study Finds

    “These results are particularly concerning when you consider the risk of exposure to the consumer combined with the size and scale of a multibillion-dollar industry that provides these products to millions of consumers daily,” says senior study author Graham Peaslee, PhD, a professor of physics at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  15. What’s in Your Lipstick? Study Finds ‘Forever Chemicals’ Common in Cosmetics

    New research conducted by researchers at the University of Notre Dame found that nearly half of cosmetic products tested in a study contain potentially harmful chemicals called per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS).

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  16. Notre Dame Study Finds High Levels Of Toxic PFAS Chemicals In Cosmetics

    A University of Notre Dame study has found many cosmetics sold in the United States may contain high levels of PFAS, a class of toxic chemicals.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  17. New study finds alarming amount of toxic chemicals in cosmetics

    That is the difference between us and Europe who has strict labeling laws, ours are not necessarily enforced, so it is up to the companies to know what they are putting in the product and tell us,” says Graham Peaslee, Professor of Physics at Notre Dame.  

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  18. Use of PFAS in cosmetics 'widespread,' new study finds

    Many cosmetics sold in the United States and Canada likely contain high levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), a potentially toxic class of chemicals linked to a number of serious health conditions, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  19. A New Study Found High Levels of Toxic 'Forever Chemicals' In 120 Cosmetic Products

    After testing 231 cosmetics - including foundations, mascaras, concealers, and lip, eye, and eyebrow products - from stores such as Ulta Beauty, Sephora, and Target, the University of Notre Dame researchers found that 52 percent contained high levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS).

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  20. Study shows PFAS widespread in cosmetics

    Graham Peaslee, senior author of the study and a professor of physics at the University of Notre Dame, said in a statement that chemicals in makeup are largely unregulated in the United States and Canada, which creates challenges around conveying safety information to the public.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

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