1. How to protect consumers from deceptive comparison pricing

    Researchers from Duke University, University of Notre Dame, and Microsoft published a new Journal of Marketing article that examines using "true normal prices" during a sale as a way to reduce deceptive pricing tricks.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  2. Notre Dame alums create glasses that project subtitles for the deaf

    A pair of traditional looking glasses that project subtitles for a deaf or hard of hearing person is the bold vision of two recent University of Notre Dame graduates.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  3. Marya Lieberman’s paper drug tests promote safety in low-resource settings

    An estimated 10% of medical products in low- and middle-​income countries are either falsified or substandard, according to the World Health
    Organization. It’s particularly difficult in low-income regions to quickly and easily spot subpar medicines and identify their flaws.

    For years, chemist Marya Lieberman of the University of Notre Dame and her team have been developing analytical paper diagnostics

    Originally published in Chemical & Engineering News

    Originally published at science.nd.edu.

  4. Patient capital is in short supply, research finds

    But research from the University of Notre Dame's Rafael Zambrana argues that mutual fund fee structures can be set up to incentivize long-term thinking, and this yields better results for investors with the patience to commit their capital.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  5. The surprising science of climate protests

    One study on the first Earth Day, on 22 April 1970, found a long-term impact on air quality in areas that had good weather that day – which researchers used as an estimate for participation in activities. "Our approach was to use weather to essentially mimic an experiment," says Daniel Hungerman

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  6. Better to be cool than 'kool'

    In a new study, Walker and John Costello, assistant professor of marketing at the University of Notre Dame, found that consumers deemed these tactics to be marketing gimmicks, and the brands insincere. 

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  7. Mass. firefighters and their families are on the front lines of a battle with 'forever chemicals'

    “I got one of the 6,000 emails she sent,” recalled Graham Peaslee, a physics professor at the University of Notre Dame, who studies PFAS.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  8. Notre Dame installing new solar array

    The University of Notre Dame will install a 46,000-square-foot solar array on the west side of campus, along Indiana 933, as part of an ongoing effort to diversify its energy supply and achieve net zero campus carbon emissions by 2050.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  9. 'Ragpickers' of Mumbai use entrepreneurship to find meaning, study shows

    "Intersectionality in Intractable Dirty Work: How Mumbai Ragpickers Make Meaning of Their Work and Lives" was published in the Academy of Management Journal from Dean Shepherd, the Ray and Milann Siegfried Professor of Entrepreneurship at Notre Dame's Mendoza College of Business.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  10. Notre Dame student-written musical 'My Heart Says Go' takes on new life at Civic

    Most musical theater smash hits don't get their start in South Bend, but University of Notre Dame musical theater professor and director Matt Hawkins says that's about to change with "My Heart Says Go."

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  11. Measures to spotlight health risks from PFAS in firefighter gear close to becoming Indiana law

    But many firefighters and experts argue the standard set by that test is unreasonable. Among them is Graham Peaslee, a University of Notre Dame professor, who has used applied nuclear physics to measure and study PFAS in clothing, firefighter gear and various other materials.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  12. States Consider Banning Cosmetics Containing PFAS

    A study by University of Notre Dame researchers released in 2021 found that more than half the cosmetics sold in the United States and Canada were awash with a toxic industrial compound associated with serious health conditions.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  13. St. Joseph County prosecutor’s office launches first-in-nation cybercrimes initiative

    Thanks to Magnet, and partnerships between Cyber Software companies, the St. Joseph County Cyber Crimes Unit, and Notre Dame Student Investigators, St. Joseph County has been successfully using the software for months now.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  14. Officials partner with Notre Dame to fight cybercrime

    The St. Joseph County prosecutor’s office is partnering with Notre Dame and Magnet Forensics to create the first cyber unit of its kind in the country.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  15. First proactive U.S. Cybercrimes initiative launched in St. Joseph County

    The St. Joseph County prosecutor's office, partnered with Notre Dame's Center for Research Computing and the university's Cybercrime Investigation, Research, and Education Initiative to begin identifying computers compromised by malware.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  16. Investigators, Notre Dame partner with tech company to combat hacking in St. Joseph County

    Most of the attacks go undetected, sometimes for years, by the individuals and companies that are targeted but officials with the St. Joseph County Prosecutor's office and the University of Notre Dame are hoping to change that locally.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  17. Will a robot take my job? Notre Dame researcher says this view is overly pessimistic

    With the impact of industrial robots on the US labor markets in the past two decades, and an ever-increasing presence of machine-driven technology (such as artificial intelligence and ChatGPT), many employees have feared that one day robots will take their jobs. Not necessarily so, according to research recently published by Yong Suk Lee, an assistant professor in the University of Notre Dame’s Keough School of Global Affairs.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  18. Will a robot take my job? Researcher says this view is overly pessimistic

    With the impact of industrial robots on the U.S. labor markets in the past two decades, and an ever-increasing presence of machine-driven technology (such as artificial intelligence and ChatGPT), many employees have feared that one day robots will take their jobs. Not necessarily so, according to research recently published by Yong Suk Lee, an assistant professor in the University of Notre Dame's Keough School of Global Affairs.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  19. The organization of sex trafficking: Study reveals entrepreneurial cycle of human exploitation

    "Organizing the Exploitation of Vulnerable People: A Qualitative Assessment of Human Trafficking" is published in the Journal of Management by Dean Shepherd, the Ray and Milann Siegfried Professor of Entrepreneurship in Notre Dame's Mendoza College of Business, along with Vinit Parida and Joakim Wincent from the Luleå University of Technology in Sweden and Trent Williams from Indiana University.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  20. As banks grapple with bond losses, new research suggests they will comply with accounting rules but break classic investing rules

    Jeffrey Burks is the Thomas and Therese Grojean Family Associate Professor of Accountancy and the Deloitte Faculty Fellow at the University of Notre Dame's Mendoza College of Business.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

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